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“don't mind” sounds very polite and gentle. It's like the person is saying “It's ok with me.”; however, “don't care” sounds stronger and it's like the person is ...
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I don't care to get dirty. would normally mean that the speaker doesn't like getting dirty, and would presumably try to avoid it. However, it was clear from ...
They are almost synonymous, and are sometimes used that way, but they have slightly different connotations. I don't care = I'm apathetic or it doesn't ...
N.B.: Sirius is Harry's godfather, a wanted person for a crime he didn't commit, seriously worrying that villains could attack Harry any moment.
May imply a degree: I don't care (a bit, the least, a damn, a hoot, etc.) ... phrase "I don't care what" is an ellipsis of "I don't care about what", ...
Cambridge Dictionaries says it's old-fashioned, but I think the meaning should still be clear in context even for folks who haven't heard it. I would recommend ...
Is the expression "I care not" grammatically correct? Do I care not and I don't care have the same meaning? Share. Share a link to this question. Copy link
The Oxford English Dictionary lists both with the same meaning: ... But there's no basis for interpreting "could care less" to mean that the person cares ...
You can tell the shipper the item must be carefully packed because you expect the package to undergo rough handling while in transit, ...
I've done a quick search through Medieval and Early Modern Sources Online (MEMSO) and certainly have one hint of it being used in the positive, not negative ...